runwithme@joylin.ca

587-351-0976

Questions

What is your opinion on the bike lane that was implemented from Northmount Drive to 5th Avenue in Kensington (ie. 10th street)? Is this a pilot project?
I am an avid pathway user and have had feedback from commuters regarding this section of the bike path. IMO the placement of the bike lane along 10th St. NW is tight for both cars and cyclists. During rush hour, it can be dangerous due to heavy traffic from an already tight two way artery.

This is a link to the pilot project info: http://www.calgary.ca/Transportation/TP/Pages/Cycling/Cycling-Route-Improvements/10-Street-N.W.-Bike-Lane-Pilot-Project.aspx

Bike lanes serve an important role in Calgary by providing a healthy, green alternative to driving. If we continue to support these initiatives through proper communication with residents, commuters and planners, Calgarians can reap the benefits of a healthier lifestyle while reducing the number of cars on the road.
I'm concerned about noise by the train by Pt McKay/Parkdale. Druh says it’s a federal matter but won’t at least voice concerns or advocate to the feds.
While the CPR trains do fall under federal regulation, you are right that more can be done to express concerns to that level of government (on such matters as noise and/or transportation of dangerous goods).
I believe a left turn is needed for north bound 29th St off of 3rd Avenue/Memorial Drive.
I agree with your assessment of the need for a turning light at 29 Ave and Memorial Drive.
We need an adjustment of speeds along Bowness Road in front of Belcher from 60 to 50km/h.
Reduction from 60km/h to 50km/h in front of Belcher would have to be reviewed by traffic personnel and with residents for their feedback.
14th St at 20th Ave is an extremely busy intersection. What will you do to alleviate traffic congestion on 14th St, and how can you help my neighbours and I stop the speeding by drivers using 22nd Ave as a thoroughfare?
Possible solutions might include:

a. Increasing the allowable traffic speed along 16th Ave from 50km/h to 60km/h (to encourage more traffic to divert there); and b. Closing traffic entry points onto 21st, 22nd and 23rd Ave on either side of 14th St NW

Joylin believes the proper forum for decision making is not "quick" answers but an engagement with the residents affected.

-answered by Joylin for Ward 7 Team
What were your thoughts on last year's tentative Crowchild Trail expansion plan? Are you committed to protecting inner city neighbourhoods from overbuilt, car-centric infrastructure projects?
I am not supportive of previous Crowchild Trail expansion plans for various reasons. When possible, construction plans need to be minimally invasive to nearby neighborhoods with community input every step of the way.

The pinch points at 24th Ave & Crowchild Tr and again at 5th Ave & Kensington can be addressed with an interchange (a simple design with minimum disruption to residents). This would greatly improve the flow of traffic. However, it is my hope that in the future our City can explore options that lessen (rather than encourage) traffic on Crowchild Tr (and other heavily used roads). Funding through various levels of government can help achieve this. I am a fan of Vancouver's Skytrain. I am also a strong advocate for walkable/bikeable cities. I myself am a commuter on foot running 10k each way to work throughout the year.
I am worried about traffic and wondering what you think, and or would do if elected. Namely the idea that getting people to and from downtown to far out urban areas is the most important concept. We live in the older inner city neighborhood of Highwood. Traffic is driving us out of the city. A lot of people short cutting down our street at high rates of speed. Traffic noise so loud that two large fountains in the back yard can’t drown the noise from McKnight BLVD!

The curbs installed to calm traffic only keeps the cars in the area longer causing massive traffic jams, polluting the neighborhood, and making getting around within our neighborhood on foot, or bike, or even your our car, harder! Traffic in this city is so bad we are thinking of moving, Calgary has so much to offer, and things to do, but when you can’t even get out of your community it really doesn’t matter.
Traffic is a huge concern in most areas of our City. With over 20 000 newcomers relocating to our City each year, we will continue to face serious traffic congestion in the years to come. With a lack of adequate transit and scarce infrastructure dollars (to widen roads/introduce interchanges to improve flow), we will need to look at funding from various levels of government to handle our growing population.

Your area of Highwood is often subject to cut through traffic due to its proximity to downtown and McKnight. It is my hope that our new Council will prioritize spending so we can have more funds invested back into our established neighborhoods (better transit, improved roads and paths for better walkability/bikeability, lighting at night and early morning for safety). There is a potential North Central LRT line in discussion at the moment. If this proceeds, over 30 000 commuters will be taking this route to work alleviating congestion in your area. In the mean time, we need more buses during peak hours to promote ridership and less car centric means of getting around. There is no easy solution!

If elected, I will be serving your community and keeping you and your neighbors informed on decisions and projects affecting your area. I am working hard to become elected so I can dedicate myself to improving the lives of many Calgarians!
We are concerned about the noise from the new airplane traffic over Bridgeland and Crescent Heights. Planes started flying across Bridgeland for the first time in February of 2011, and across Crescent Heights in March of 2012. Most likely due to the construction of the new runway, jets now frequently fly south-west diagonally across Bridgeland instead of the previous trajectory along the Deerfoot. Before February of 2011, the furthest west the jets would fly was over Tom Campbell's Hill. Since March 2012, propeller planes fly south-west over Crescent Heights. They are allowed to fly over our residences at 1000ft, which they do carrying cargo in the middle of the night. When this happens they are so loud they sound like B-52 bombers over our house, this seriously affects our ability to sleep. Both types of planes fly all throughout the day and night over our communities. It is not unusual to hear jets fly over Bridgeland as little as 15 seconds apart from 5:30am until 8:00am. Incidentally, we are also amazed that planes are now allowed to fly over the downtown at all, especially at such low altitudes.

We are concerned about the extreme amount of disturbing noise that this new air traffic has created. We wonder how the Airport Authority has been allowed to change the flight paths to be over previously unaffected residential areas. (If we had known that one day we would be in a flight path, we would not have purchased homes in Bridgeland and Crescent Heights.) We would like to see a return to the pre-February 2011 flight trajectories; specifically a return to the former flight path which was straight north away from the city and straight south over the already busy and noisy Deerfoot corridor.
Your questions are very important. I myself am a very light sleep (sensitive to noise) so I cannot imagine the noise you are experiencing from airplane traffic over top of your house.

When I phoned 311 they directed me to call 411 as this is an issue for the Airport Authority which falls under a different jurisdiction. I called 411 only to be told there was no one available to speak on the issue of noise and flight path. I left a message so hopefully I will hear back soon.